British Popular Culture Essay

American And British Influence On The Australian Pop Culture In 1950s

Both the American and the British has influenced Australia a lot during the 1950s. America, however, influenced them in more ways than the British. After the WWII, Australia was more dependent on the United States than Britain, therefore, their attachment grew stronger. America became Australia's largest trading partner and was dominated by American music, dance, movies, tv programs and foods. Australia was so influenced by the American culture, that it is said that none of our culture belong to us and instead a reflection of the American lifestyle.

Due to the technological advances, transmission of American products and ideas into Australian Society became less complicated. Therefore, it was easier for the American to have a cultural influences on Australia.

During the 1950s, both British and Australia fell under the influence of American rock n roll music. People such as Bill Haley and Elvis Presley became extremely popular. This was the generation of the teenagers and teenage rebellion. An Australian performer, Johnny O'keefe became Australia's "Elvis". American culture was helped by the development of radio, that enable them to influence foreign culture in more ways. This technological development opened a gate like a one way communication where popular culture from other country can travel worldwide.

The newly formed "teenagers" followed the american teenage way of life. Teens starts to get jobs to earn some cash to spend on fashion, movies, music and other form of American entertainment. Movies based on teenage rebellion such as the wild one and rebel without a cause was very popular. On the other hand, parents thought that this was an unacceptable behaviour. Teenagers, who were non existent in previous years was known as a specific group with a specific appearance.

In 1956, television was invented and radio stations relied on the teenage american music for their popularity. Playlists were dominated by a lot of American and British music. Furthermore, people were putting on American accent for advertisement to make their product look "superior".

After the WWII Australia hardly made any movie worth comparing to those made by Americans. 75% of the movies screened is American and 18%...

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Single essay sought for inclusion in a collection of essays on literary tourism and the British Isles, under contract for publication by Lexington Books in December 2018, to round out a section on contemporary popular culture and tourism. The collection explores the complex and mutually informing relationships among narratives of history, fiction and film, and tourism via a series of studies of physical locations in the British Isles. The essays that comprise the collection examine the phenomenon of literary travel and the construction and interpretation of “place” through a range of epistemological and critical frameworks, including feminism, cultural studies, geographic and mobilities paradigms, eco-literary tourism, ecosystems, historicity and historicality, dark tourism, and content analysis of marketing practices. Taken together, the essays contribute to our greater understanding of the role that literature and literary tourism has played in shaping how locations in Britain have been seen, historicized, and valued. Further, and more importantly, they complicate our understanding of how the “history” of any place is transmitted to visitors in the present, with consequences for the way the past will be remembered in the future. The collection editor seeks a previously unpublished essay that takes as its subject an influential popular literary book, series, or film and explores the intersection between its imagined British setting and narratives of tourism associated with that location and its history. While the editor is open to studies of any popular writer or film, she is particularly interested in including an essay on Tolkien tourism, new scholarship on tourism and the Harry Potter series, Game of Thrones and tourism, or other fantasy literature and tourism.

Please send completed 25-30 page essays for consideration to the collection editor, LuAnn McCracken Fletcher, at lmfletch@cedarcrest.edu, no later than March 15, 2018. The final draft of the accepted essay will be due no later than July 1, 2018.

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